Addressing the Underlying Causes of Deforestation
and Forest Degradation

A joint initiative to contribute to the
Intergovernmental Forum on Forests (IFF)
(16 January 1998)

APPLYING ORGANIZATION: Organizing Committee for the joint initiative on underlying causes of deforestation and forest degradation.

The Organizing Committee is composed of a representative of the Government of Costa Rica, a representative of the UN Environment Program, representatives of NGOs from seven geographic regions and a representative of an international indigenous peoples organization (IPO). A joint, global secretariat for this process has been established within two organizations: the World Rainforest Movement (Uruguay) and the Netherlands Committee for IUCN. Part of the Secretariat function is to coordinate fundraising efforts, and to serve as a funding agent to receive and distribute funds to members of the Organizing Committee in accordance with the activities and budget outline below. Contact persons are: Ricardo Carrere (World Rainforest Movement) and Simone Lovera (Netherlands Committee for IUCN). Further information on these organizations, along with the names of the other members of the Organizing Committee, is included in Annex 3

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The main activity of this project will be the organization of a global workshop on the global and regional underlying causes and their relationship to national underlying causes as recommended by the Intergovernmental Panel on Forests. This workshop will be preceded by a comprehensive consultation process in seven different regions. Indigenous Peoples’ Organizations (IPOs) will be actively involved in all regional processes. Also, a separate workshop for IPOs will be organized shortly before the global workshop to discuss the results of the various regional processes. The regional processes will include, inter alia, the preparation and collection of case-studies on the underlying causes of deforestation and forest degradation in the various regions. These case studies will be discussed at regional/IPO workshops, fora and/or consultation processes, to be determined by the regions/IPOs themselves. The results of the regional/IPO processes and a selection of case studies will be presented to the global workshop, which will be organized in November-December 1998 in Costa Rica.

A steering committee will be formed consisting of representatives of governments, international agencies, IPOs, community-based organizations (CBOs) and NGOs. This steering committee will meet several times to further elaborate on the project and provide substantive advice and overall guidance to the Organizing Committee. These steering committee meetings will also include a number of public roundtables which will be organized parallel to major intergovernmental meetings addressing specific major underlying causes of deforestation and forest degradation.

The project proposal provides for an effective follow-up, including a presentation, in close cooperation with the lead agency on underlying causes of the Interagency Task Force on Forests, the UN Environment Program (UNEP), of the results of the workshop and consultation processes at the third meeting of the Intergovernmental Forum on Forests, and the subsequent dissemination of these results to local, national, regional and global stakeholders through an active outreach strategy.

I. INTRODUCTION

1. BACKGROUND

Alarming past and current trends in global deforestation and forest degradation document a deepening forest crisis worldwide. During the last decade, in particular, the forest crisis has received increasing attention and has prompted many initiatives by governments and intergovernmental agencies, such as: The Tropical Forest Action Plan, Chapter 11 of Agenda 21 and the non-binding Forest Principles (agreed to at the 1992 Earth Summit), national forest programs in many countries, and regional processes to develop and apply criteria and indicators of sustainable forest management. Still, these and other responses appear to be insufficient in being able to achieve a significant deceleration and reversal of the above-mentioned trends.

Many people have analyzed the potential explanations of why these recent responses to the forest crisis have failed to generate the significant progress needed. There seems to be broad agreement that these initiatives have focused far too much attention on the proximate causes of deforestation/forest degradation (and factors within the forest sector), and have largely ignored the underlying (root) causes of these problems. For example, the best forest management plans can be overwhelmed by powerful transboundary economic forces driving deforestation.

2. THE INTERGOVERNMENTAL PANEL ON FORESTS (IPF)

Given the lack of progress on combating deforestation since UNCED and in order to promote and monitor the implementation of Chapter 11 of Agenda 21 and the Forest Principles, the U.N. Commission on Sustainable Development in 1995 established an Intergovernmental Panel on Forests to address a wide range of forest-related issues, including one element entitled: "Underlying Causes of Deforestation and Forest Degradation". The IPF produced a final report in early 1997 containing a set of 135 proposals for action that governments have agreed to implement. This package of proposals was formally endorsed at the June 1997 UN General Assembly Special Session (UNGASS) on the implementation of Agenda 21.

The Panel noted, inter alia, "the critical need to understand the underlying causes of deforestation and forest degradation, which are often country-specific. A focused approach is needed that concentrates on reversing the most damaging processes and promoting the most effective and beneficial measures. It is also important to recognize local initiatives that could counter current trends in deforestation and forest degradation, especially among indigenous and local communities."

The panel also noted that "It is important to consider historical dimensions and to learn from experience. Many of the factors causing deforestation or forest degradation interact, and some are synergistic. Most causes are social and economic in character. Although some courses of action, such as unsustainable timber extraction, are linked to the forest sector itself, inappropriate policy choices and approaches in other sectors can also influence deforestation and forest degradation." The Panel mentioned a number of potential underlying causes, including production and consumption patterns, land tenure patterns, land speculation and land markets, illegal logging, illegal land occupation and illegal cultivation, grazing pressures, unsustainable agriculture, the demand for fuelwood and charcoal to meet basic energy needs, refugee-related problems, mining and oil exploitation, natural climatic events and forest fires, discriminatory international trade and trade distorting practices, poorly regulated investment, structural adjustment programmes, external debt, market distortions and subsidies, including those for agricultural commodities, poverty and demographic pressure.

In terms of underlying causes, the IPF proposals for action urged all countries, with the support of international organizations and the participation of major groups, to take, inter alia, the following significant steps:

Case studies (Proposal 31a): "To undertake case studies using the "diagnostic framework" to identify the most important underlying causes of deforestation and forest degradation, to develop and test the usefulness of the framework as an analytical tool in assessing options for utilization of forest and forest lands and to refine it, disseminate the results and apply it more widely as appropriate". The diagnostic framework was described within an IPF background paper on this topic, and outlines a sequential methodology for analyzing the relationships between (a) symptoms (e.g., reduction in forest area); (b) direct causes (e.g., expansion of industrial agriculture for cash crops); and (c) underlying causes/related factors. These studies are to include a comprehensive analysis of the historical perspective of the causes of these processes, including transboundary economic forces;

In-depth studies (Proposal 27a and b): "To prepare in-depth studies of the underlying causes at the national and international levels of deforestation and forest degradation and to analyse comprehensively the historical perspective of the causes of deforestation and forest degradation in the world, and other international underlying causes of deforestation and forest degradation, including transboundary economic forces;

Global workshop (Proposal 28c): "To support the convening, as soon as possible, of a global workshop on the international underlying causes of deforestation and forest degradation and their relationship to national underlying causes" ;

Land tenure and benefit sharing (Proposal 29c): "To formulate policies aiming at securing land tenure for local communities and indigenous people, including policies, as appropriate, aimed at the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits of forests."

National strategies (Proposal 29a and b): "To formulate and implement national strategies, through an open and participatory process, for addressing these underlying causes and , if appropriate, to define policy goals for national forest cover as inputs to the implementation of national forest programmes, and to develop mechanisms, such as environmental impact assessments, to improve policy formulation and coordination, through an open and participatory process";

3. THE INTERGOVERNMENTAL FORUM ON FORESTS (IFF)

A. Background

As a follow-up to the IPF, at UNGASS, governments established the Intergovernmental Forum on Forests (IFF) to:

(i) promote implementation of the 135 IPF proposals for action;

(ii) monitor such implementation; and

(iii) address matters left pending by the IPF (e.g., financial resources, transfer of technology and trade and the environment).

The Forum was also mandated to identify the possible elements of and work towards consensus on international arrangements and mechanisms, for example, a legally binding instrument on all types of forests.

The first meeting of the IFF (IFF-1) was held during 1 - 3 October 1997 in New York to define the terms of reference of the three-year work program. Participants decided to include analysis of underlying causes of deforestation and forest degradation in the program of work, "including transboundary economic forces of deforestation and forest degradation, taking into account a historical perspective and the pressures exerted on forests by other sectors, notably agriculture in the quest for food security". This issue was incorporated under Category II, related with matters left pending and other issues arising from the program elements of the IPF process.

B. NGO Contributions to Discussions on Underlying Causes at IFF-1

Participants in the IFF-1 meeting affirmed the important role of NGOs and other major groups in the IFF process as observers on a fully participatory basis. Indeed, governments encouraged inputs from major groups in all the activities under the IFF program of work.

At IFF-1, NGOs announced a particular interest in contributing to the IFF deliberations on underlying causes. At one of the formal plenary sessions, a group of nearly 20 NGOs presented a joint statement expressing their willingness to contribute -- with their intellectual, organizational and financial capacities -- to a joint initiative on national and international underlying causes designed to help inform the IFF discussions on this topic. The NGO statement included the following elements:

(i) An offer to organize, in partnership with governments, the global workshop on national and international underlying causes referenced above. The statement invited governments and international agencies to join NGOs as partners in organizing this workshop, and suggested the workshop could include:

- presentations by governments of their case studies using the diagnostic framework proposed by the IPF -- with a focus on solution-oriented approaches to addressing underlying causes; and

- presentations by NGOs and indigenous peoples on relevant reports and case studies on underlying causes.

(ii) A proposal that the workshop organizers prepare a synthesis report of the results, focused on solution-oriented approaches, and that this report form the basis for a review by the IFF on the progress being made in implementing the IPF Proposals for Action on underlying causes.

In the statement, it was suggested that the global workshop be patterned on the "International Meeting of Indigenous and other Forest-Dependent Peoples on the Management, Conservation and Sustainable Development of all Types of Forests," which was held in Leticia, Colombia, on 9 - 13 December 1996. This meeting under the IPF was sponsored by the Governments of Colombia and Denmark and organized by the International Alliance of Indigenous-Tribal Peoples of the Tropical Forests, the Coordinating Body of Indigenous Organizations of the Amazon Basin (COICA) and the Organization of Indigenous Peoples of the Colombian Amazon (OPIAC).

The proposals put forward by the NGO-coalition at IFF-1 were welcomed by many participants. Several governments, for example, expressed their willingness to join as partners in the process and the Costa Rican Government officially offered to host the global workshop. UNEP, the lead agency on underlying causes within the Interagency Task Force on Forests also expressed strong interest in cooperating in the process.

More specific ideas on the project were discussed at an informal meeting held during IFF-1 involving representatives of governments, NGOs and intergovernmental agencies. Subsequently, an Organizing Committee was formed to help advance this initiative, beginning with the elaboration of a framework project proposal and preliminary fundraising efforts. A partnership of the World Rainforest Movement and the Netherlands Committee for IUCN was asked to serve as a joint global secretariat for the process.

II. GOAL AND OBJECTIVES

The goal of this project is to support and build upon the effective implementation of the IPF Proposals for Action covering underlying causes of deforestation and forest degradation (Proposals 27 - 31: see Section II above) and the ongoing work of the Intergovernmental Forum on Forests. More specific objectives of this project are:

(i) to contribute to further analysis of the major underlying causes of deforestation and forest degradation at the national, regional and global levels -- on the basis of new and existing case-studies, other in-depth studies, a global workshop and various participatory dialogue/consultation processes;

(ii) to raise the level of awareness and facilitate a heightened dialogue about these underlying causes among a broad range of governmental and non-governmental actors, both within and outside the forest sector;

(iii) to stimulate partnerships among stakeholders around solution-oriented approaches to these issues, including needed policy reforms and other actions.

III. GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE PROJECT

1. COORDINATION OF PROJECT

A. Organizing and Steering Committees

The coordination of this project will be carried out through the work of two committees. The coalition which was formed at IFF-1 established an Organizing Committee to take the lead role in organizing this project. The Committee is composed of a representative of the Government of Costa Rica, a representative of UNEP, NGO-representatives from seven geographic regions and a representative of an international indigenous peoples organization (IPO).

The eight regional/IPO "focal points" will be responsible for organizing the preparatory processes in their respective regions or within their constituencies (see Section 3 below). This will include, in particular, ensuring a broadly participatory process and substantive inputs into the global workshop from all major regions and from the indigenous peoples constituency. The Organizing Committee has asked the World Rainforest Movement (Uruguay) and the Netherlands Committee for IUCN to provide a joint global secretariat function. The joint Secretariat will provide overall coordination of the project, facilitate the work of the regional/IPO focal points, and ensure coherence among the project's major activities.

The Steering Committee will further elaborate on the project and provide substantive advice and overall guidance to the Organizing Committee. The Steering Committee will consist of the Organizing Committee, representatives of governments, the IFF Secretariat, and other NGOs, IPOs and community-based organizations (CBOs). Annex 1 provides further details on the responsibilities of the Organizing and Steering Committees. More detailed Terms of Reference for these Committees will be elaborated at the first meeting of the Steering Committee in February 1998.

Planning meetings of the Organizing Committee and Steering Committee will be held on a regular basis. To ensure an efficient use of financial and other resources, these meetings -- as well as regional and IPO events -- will be planned as far as possible parallel to other relevant meetings.

B. Coordination with Official IFF Process

The project will be carried out in close coordination with the IFF Secretariat and the IFF Bureau. For example, the IFF Secretariat has been invited to the Steering Committee and will be consulted on a regular basis in relation to all major activities. All reports of meetings, including the global workshop and regional meetings and roundtables, will be circulated to the IFF Secretariat.

2. OVERALL APPROACH TO PROJECT

The main challenge of the project will be to involve all the main actors and stakeholders on underlying causes in a broadly participatory process and to move beyond general discussion to concrete solutions and actions. A strong emphasis will be put upon developing national, regional and global partnerships between governmental and non-governmental actors and IPOs aimed at developing solution-oriented approaches towards addressing underlying causes.

An important emphasis should be to bring out the viewpoints of local communities and other major groups and ensure that local visions and priorities are fully taken into account into future proposed actions. The main challenge for the organizers will be to mobilize effectively community-based organizations. For that reason, there will be a strong emphasis on the regional preparatory process in the overall project. There will be a regional process in every continent (Latin America, Africa, Asia, Oceania and the Pacific, the former USSR-countries, Europe and North America) and a specific workshop for indigenous peoples which will discuss and further elaborate the results of the regional processes.

Both the regional/IPO meetings and consultation processes and the global workshop itself will take into account the modalities of work of the IFF and the principles proposed by the first IFF-meeting. Thus meetings will:

  • be informal in nature;
  • be in full conformity with the tasks assigned to the Forum;
  • be open-ended, transparent and participatory;include a balanced representation from countries reflecting a range of interests and views of all interested parties;
  • include gender balanced participation;
  • ensure that the timing and topic under consideration is harmonized with the schedule of work of the Forum.

It is also important to note that many important national and international underlying causes of forest degradation are not found within the forest sector itself. The process should target a political level that can undertake actions on underlying causes, i.e. not only the forest sector, but also sectors such as agriculture and energy, as well as financial and economic decision makers in general. There is a need for an effective strategy to link up with other existing processes such as:

  • the local, national, regional and global follow-up process to major international Summits (the UN Conference on Environment and Development, the International Conference on Population and Development, the World Summit on Social Development, the UN Conference on Women and Development and the World Food Summit); and
  • the ongoing debate within various intergovernmental institutions like the Bretton Woods Institutions, the Human Rights Commission, the Convention on Biological Diversity, UNDP, FAO and the OECD.

3. PROJECT ACTIVITIES

Four general categories of activities are planned:

A. Regional and Indigenous Preparatory Processes

The regional/IPO preparatory processes will form the most essential part of the project. Regional preparatory processes will be carried out in all major regions (Latin America, Africa, Asia, Oceania and the Pacific, the former USSR-countries, Europe and North America). IPOs will play an active role in the various regional processes, taking into account the Chairpersonīs report and Proposals for Action of the above-mentioned Leticia meeting of Indigenous and other Forest-dependent Peoples. Also, shortly before the global workshop, a specific workshop for IPOs will be organized to discuss and evaluate the results of the regional processes in the light of the Leticia Proposals for Action. These preparatory processes will serve as the major vehicle for implementing the overall approach outlined above. They will also provide the substantive inputs into the global workshop.

To carry out these preparatory processes, workshops, brainstorming sessions and internet-facilitated dialogue processes are among the possible activities that have been discussed within the Organizing Committee. However, these preparatory processes will be decentralized; the specific activities to be undertaken will be determined by the regions in the coming months. In this regard, one of the main challenges for the regional focal points will be to mobilize effectively the involvement of community-based organizations.

The preparation and collection of case-studies on underlying causes of deforestation and forest degradation in the various regions will form an essential element of the regional/IPO processes. It should be ensured that valuable existing case studies and other, generic in-depth studies are being incorporated in the over-all process. All governmental, non-governmental and IPO stakeholders will be invited to undertake new case studies, and to help collect and synthesize existing studies. In the preparation of new case studies, and in the synthesis and analysis of existing studies, the diagnostic framework described in the IPF proposals for action will be employed whenever possible. The process will thus contribute to the consensus building process on how to apply the diagnostic framework recommended by the IPF.

Through workshops and other activities, these case studies, and additional, generic in-depth studies on specific topics, will be presented and analyzed in order to identify:

(i) commonalties among underlying causes at the national and international levels;

(ii) the main obstacles to addressing specific underlying causes in that region;

(iii) general, solution-oriented approaches to addressing these obstacles, including various political, legal, economic, financial, social and institutional mechanisms which can be used to address "causative chains"; and

(iv) practical policy reforms and other specific measures to address these underlying causes.

Each regional preparatory process, and the IPO preparatory process, will culminate in the production of a report on addressing underlying causes in that region (or from the perspective of IPOs).

B. Strategic Roundtables

A close interaction should be ensured between the analysis of underlying causes proposed through this project and developments in major intergovernmental fora which address transboundary economic forces and other underlying causes of deforestation and forest degradation. For that reason, it is proposed that each steering committee meeting will include one or more strategic roundtables in which the regional/IPO focal points can report back from their respective processes and preliminary results can be discussed with stakeholders and experts involved in other processes and institutions (for example the WTO, the follow-up to the World Food Summit, the Commission for Sustainable Development, etc.). These roundtable meetings will thus provide an opportunity to exchange information on the preparatory process and on recent international developments which might be relevant for the debate on underlying causes. These strategic roundtable discussions will be vehicle for:

(i) engaging in a more targeted way decision-makers from outside the forest sector;

(ii) linking up in a more targeted way with important non-forest sector and institutional actors, such as The World Bank, World Trade Organization and others;

(iii) focusing on issues of particular strategic importance; and

(iv) further broadening input into the global workshop.

C. Global Workshop

A five-day global workshop will be organized in close cooperation with the host country, Costa Rica. The workshop will be held between the second and third meetings of the IFF, probably in November or December 1998. Participants will include representatives of governments, intergovernmental organizations and civil society stakeholder groups.

The objectives of this workshop are:

(i) to facilitate an inter-regional dialogue, involving all major stakeholder groups, on solution-oriented approaches to addressing the major underlying causes of deforestation and forest degradation taking into account the conclusions and proposals for action of the IPF (See Section 2 above); and

(ii) to produce a set of options for action for consideration by the IFF and other relevant institutions and processes, with a particular focus on practical approaches for addressing underlying causes of deforestation and forest degradation.

Reports of the regional and IPO preparatory processes, and the strategic roundtables, will provide major inputs into the workshop. Participants will be requested to give proper consideration to the need for local, national, regional and global follow-up measures. The emphasis will be on adopting a problem-solving -- instead of accusatory -- approach, in order to identify practical solutions that address the underlying causes, and potential obstacles to these solutions.

D. Dissemination of results and follow-up

A report of the meeting -- in English, Spanish and French -- will be prepared by the Organizing Committee, taking into account the specific mandate of the lead agency on underlying causes for the Interagency Task Force on Forests, UNEP, and in close consultation with other members of the Steering Committee. The centerpiece of the report will be a set of options for action for consideration by the IFF and other relevant institutions and processes. Several thousand copies of the report will be disseminated widely in early 1999 to governmental and non-governmental actors within and outside the forest sector, to help inform the debate and stimulate wide-ranging discussions on concrete policy reforms and other measures to implement the relevant Proposals for Action of the IPF.

In addition, the report will be distributed at the IFF-3 meeting (February 1999) and presented at a formal plenary session, as well as at a more informal briefing session. The results of this process will help to inform two aspects of the IFF work program. Firstly, it can help prioritize and better define practical measures that should be taken from among the 135 IPF proposals for action. Secondly, it can inform the IFF discussions on matters left pending -- in particular, discussions regarding trade and the environment and financial assistance.

An elaborate outreach strategy --reaching beyond the IFF process -- will be undertaken to ensure that the results of this project reach the most important local, national, regional and global actors, and help to inform important debates and processes. This outreach strategy will be developed in close consultation with the Steering Committee, UNEP and the IFF Secretariat. The strategy will include dissemination of the results via the internet, by means of a special web-site and posting the results on various list-servers. The results will also be presented at a number of important national, regional and global events, inter alia, through panel discussions and roundtables. The outreach strategy will include further national, regional and global dialogue processes amongst major stakeholder groups in order to trigger policies, measures and other actions to follow-up the results of the project.

IV. EXPECTED OUTPUTS

(i) Case studies and in-depth studies on specific topics to create a greater understanding of underlying causes, including causative chains;

(ii) Greater awareness among governmental and non-governmental actors within and outside the forest sector of underlying causes;

(iii) A set of concrete and practical options for action including policy reforms and other measures to effectively address underlying causes -- including identification of specific actors who could implement these options for action, where and when they should be implemented, and how; and

(iv) Increased dialogue and partnerships among stakeholders to facilitate effective implementation of IPF Proposals for Action and more specific actions that are needed.

 

ANNEX 1:
RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE ORGANIZING AND STEERING COMMITTEES

Organizing Committee Responsibilities

The NGO-coalition which drafted the above-mentioned proposal during the first IFF-meeting has formed an organizing committee with representatives of 7 geographical regions and a representative of indigenous peoples. Indigenous peoples were invited as a specific constituency as is was felt that this is the only way to guarantee their participation from the beginning of the process, taking into account that indigenous concerns are crucial in addressing underlying causes. Also, the host country of the global workshop, Costa Rica, and the lead agency on underlying causes for the Interagency Task Force on Forests, UNEP were invited to the Organizing Committee.

The organizing committee includes the following regional/indigenous peoples focal points:

  • Indigenous Peoples: Joji Carino, International Alliance of Indigenous-Tribal Peoples of the Tropical Forests, UK
  • North America: Sheldon Cohen of Bionet-US and Claudia D’Andrea, IUCN-US
  • Latin America: Rosario Ortiz, Latin America Forests Network, Colombia and Martha Nunez, Latin America Forests Network, Ecuador
  • Former USSR: Andrei Laletin, Friends of the Siberian Forests/ IUCN Temperate and Boreal Forest Program, Russian Federation
  • Africa: Lambert Okrah, Green Earth Organization, Ghana
  • Europe: Marcus Colchester, Forest Peoples Program, UK and Saskia Ozinga, FERN, UK
  • Asia: Mia Siscawati of RMI, the Indonesian Institute for Forest and Environment/Bioforum, Indonesia
  • Oceania and Pacific: Ian Fry of Pacific BioWeb, Australia

These focal points have taken up the responsibility of organizing the preparatory processes in their respective regions or constituencies. Their responsibilities include:

  1. preparing and collecting case studies and in-depth studies on underlying causes of deforestation and forest degradation. The case studies should combine a diagnostic approach with a problem solving orientation;
  2. actively mobilizing community-based organizations and ensuring the incorporation of their views and ideas in the overall process;
  3. organization of a regional/IPO workshop/forum and/or consultation process;
  4. active communication with and outreach to other major stakeholders in their region or constituency;
  5. presenting views and ideas from their regions or constituencies at the roundtables organized parallel to intergovernmental meetings;
  6. ensuring a well-prepared presentation of case studies and views from their region or constituency at the global workshop;
  7. implementing an active outreach strategy in their region or constituency in order to communicate the results of the global workshop to a broad range of stakeholders within and outside the forest sector in their region or constituency.

The organizing committee has asked the international secretariat of the World Rainforest Movement (Uruguay) and the Netherlands Committee for IUCN to perform as a global secretariat. The responsibilities of this global secretariat, which will work in close cooperation with the organizing committee, include:

  1. overall coordination of the project and facilitation of the work of the regional/IPO focal points;
  2. coordinating and ensuring coherence between the activities of the regional/IPO focal points;
  3. facilitating active communication within the steering committee;
  4. organizing the meetings of the steering committee and the strategic roundtables;
  5. liaison with other governments and international organizations;
  6. fundraising;
  7. organization of the global workshop, in close cooperation with the Government of Costa Rica;
  8. presentation of the results of the global workshop at the Intergovernmental Forum on Forests, in close cooperation with UNEP, the lead agency on underlying causes of the ITFF;
  9. implementation of the global outreach strategy, including the publication and dissemination of the results of the global workshop to a large number of stakeholders within and outside the forest sector.

More detailed Terms of Reference for the organizing committee will be elaborated at the first meeting of the steering committee.

Steering Committee Responsibilities

A number of government representatives from various regions have been invited as partners to the organizing committee in the steering committee. The steering committee also includes a representative of the IFF Secretariat. Furthermore, partnerships will be build with the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity and organizations which have started their own research programs on this issue. The steering committee will also include a few additional representatives of IPOs, community-based organizations and NGOs.

The steering committee will meet regularly in order to elaborate the themes and structure of the overall project and to provide advice and overall guidance to the organizing committee. It should be realized that national, regional and global underlying causes of deforestation and forest degradation form a very complex issue. Consequently, there is a need for a profound and ongoing debate within the steering committee about the preliminary results of the case studies and regional/IPO processes, the most important themes to be discussed and the most effective process through which these themes can be further elaborated.

The Steering Committee members will also be actively involved in the consultation process and/or workshops in their specific region or constituency.

To ensure an efficient use of financial and other resources, the meetings of the steering committee and the regional and IPO events will be planned as much as possible parallel to other relevant meetings.

Detailed Terms of Reference for the steering committee will be elaborated at its first meeting.

 

ANNEX 2:
TIMETABLE OF ACTIVITIES

October - December 1997

Establishment of the organizing committee
Four meetings of the organizing committee to draft an outline for the project proposal and elect a global secretariat
Establishment of a global secretariat
Elaboration of a project proposal
Establishment of the steering committee
Initial fundraising
Mobilization and consultation of community-based organizations
Initial elaboration of the proposals for regional/IPO workshops and consultation processes
Preparation of general guidelines and criteria for case studies
Initial collection and preparation of case studies and in-depth studies by regional/IPO focal points

January - March 1998

Mobilization and consultation of community-based organizations
Further elaboration of the proposals for regional/IPO workshops and consultation processes
Initial implementation of regional/IPO workshops and consultation processes
Further preparation and collection of case studies and in-depth studies
Continuation of fundraising
First meeting of the steering committee and strategic roundtable (in between meeting of Commission on Social Development and intersessional meeting of Commission for Sustainable Development in New York)
Further elaboration of the themes and structure of the process and outreach strategy

April - June 1998

Further mobilization and consultation of community-based organizations
Further elaboration of the proposals for regional/IPO workshops or consultation processes
Further collection and preparation of case studies and in-depth studies
Further implementation of regional/IPO consultation processes
Second meeting of the steering committee and strategic roundtable parallel to an international forum addressing potential underlying causes
Further elaboration of the themes and structure of the process and outreach strategy
Continuation of fundraising
Probably first regional/IPO workshops
Presentation of preliminary results of the process and proposal for the global workshop at second IFF-meeting
Third meeting of the steering committee, organized parallel to the second IFF-meeting

July - September 1998

Further mobilization and consultation of community-based organizations
Finalization of case studies and in-depth studies
Regional workshops
Further elaboration of the themes and structure of the global workshop
Further elaboration of the outreach strategy
Finalization of fundraising

October - December 1998

Workshop of IPOs
Finalization of preparations for global workshop
Global workshop on underlying causes of deforestation and forest degradation
Preparation of results of global workshop
Fourth steering committee meeting following global workshop to evaluate preliminary results
Finalization of the outreach strategy

January - March 1999

Publication of the results of the global workshop
Presentation of the results of the process at the third IFF-meeting
Implementation of outreach strategy to large number of governmental and non-governmental actors within and outside the forest sector at local, national, regional and global levels
Implementation of results of the project by local, national, regional and global stakeholders

 

ANNEX 3:
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF ORGANIZATIONS FACILITATING THE JOINT GLOBAL SECRETARIAT:

WORLD RAINFOREST MOVEMENT (Movimiento Mundial por los Bosques Tropicales)

The World Rainforest Movement is a global network of citizens' groups of North and South involved in efforts to defend the world's rainforests against the forces that destroy them. It works to secure the lands and livelihoods of forest peoples and supports their efforts to defend the forests from commercial logging, dams, mining, plantations, shrimp farms, colonisation and settlement and other projects that threaten them.

The World Rainforest Movement was established in 1986 and initially focused its activities on the FAO and World Bank's Tropical Forestry Action Plan and on countering the excesses of the tropical timber trade and the problems of the International Tropical Timber Organisation. In 1989, the WRM published the 'Penang Declaration' which sets out the shared vision of the WRM's members. As well as identifying the main causes of tropical deforestation and singling out the deficiencies of the main official responses to the deforestation crisis, the Declaration highlights an alternative model of development in the rainforests based on securing the lands and livelihoods of forest peoples. The World Rainforest movement's International Secretariat is currently hosted by the Third World Institute in Uruguay.

International Coordinator
Ricardo Carrere
Instituto del Tercer Mundo Tel: +598 2 496192
Jackson 1136 Montevideo Fax: +598 2 419222
Uruguay Email: rcarrere@chasque.apc.org

NETHERLANDS COMMITTEE FOR IUCN

The Netherlands Committee for IUCN is an independent non-governmental foundation established by 19 Dutch members of the World Conservation Union. Its main tasks are to liaise between IUCN and its Dutch members and to implement a number of independent internationally oriented projects in line with the mandate of IUCN: ecologically sound and socially just development and the conservation of the earth's biological diversity. The Amsterdam-based office currently has a staff of 20 people. Ongoing activities for 1998 include the management of a small grants fund to support projects of Southern NGOs and Indigenous Peoples' Organizations (IPOs) which contribute to the conservation of tropical rainforests and a fund to support the participation of southern NGOs and IPOs in intergovernmental forest-related meetings. NC-IUCN also has various globally oriented research and advocacy programs on legal, institutional and macro-economic questions such as globalisation, international trade, financial instruments, foreign direct investment, consumption and production patterns, the effectiveness of international law, interagency coordination and institutional change within the United Nations. For more information please visit: http://www.nciucn.nl

Netherlands Committee for IUCN
contact person: Ms. Simone Lovera
Plantage Middenlaan 2B Tel: +31-20-6261732
1018 DD Amsterdam, the Netherlands Fax: +31-20-6279349
E-mail: Slovera@nciucn.nl
Bank account: Postbank 5370215

back to UC Process



Go to Home Page
World Rainforest Movement
Maldonado 1858 - 11200 Montevideo - Uruguay
tel:  598 2 403 2989 / fax: 598 2 408 0762
wrm@wrm.org.uy