Large-Scale Tree Plantations

Industrial tree plantations are large-scale, intensively managed, even-aged monocultures, involving vast areas of fertile land under the control of plantation companies. Management of plantations involves the use of huge amounts of water as well as agrochemicals—which harm humans, and plants and animals in the plantations and surrounding areas.

In response to an article that was published in WRM’s bulletin, Missão Tabita and WRM received letters from the plantation company, Portucel, and the organization, ORAM. The letters claimed that the article was untrue; however, neither Portucel nor ORAM could prove that the information published was not true.
Civil society organizations welcomed a Technical Committee report set up by the government of Sierra Leone to look into a legal dispute between the multinational company Socfin and communities affected by the company’s oil palm plantations in the Malen Chiefdom in Sierra Leone. The completion of the report concludes the investigative phase of the conflict resolution process concerning the land conflict between Socfin and communities in the Malen Chiefdom and is an important step towards finding a resolution to the long-standing land dispute.
The African women network against resource extraction (WOMIN) has compiled useful information for activists confronting the measures against the pandemic.
The completion of a report is an important step towards finding a resolution to the long-standing land dispute in the Malen Chiefdom.
This publication aims to alert community groups and activists about the corporate push for a new round of large-scale tree plantation expansion.
On 11 March 2020, the Board of the Green Climate Fund (GCF) approved a requests from the Arbaro Fund for USD 25 million to set up industrial tree plantations in seven countries in Africa and Latin America.
133 organisations and 101 individuals from 56 countries have signed the letter to the GCF Board. Specifically, they call for the rejection of a funding request from the Arbaro Fund which the GCF Board will discuss at its 25th meeting from 10-12 March.
Women, particularly those who depend on forests for their livelihoods and sustenance, face many struggles.
This editorial aims to raise a high alert with regard to the corporate agendas that dominate international forest-related processes, which appear to be entering new phases. The decisions taken have very real impacts on forest communities.
The Norwegian company APSD is establishing industrial eucalyptus plantations in Ghana for biomass fuel, which is considered a "carbon neutral" fuel. The Youth Volunteers for the Environment in Ghana spoke with communities affected by these plantations.
What are the experiences of communities living inside or adjacent to the plantation areas of companies with “zero deforestation” pledges? How can these companies continue expanding without deforesting in densely forested countries?
After more than 50 years of struggle by peasant communities who have faced all kinds of environmental and social destruction, the highest court of Cauca Valley has ruled against the industrial plantation company, Smurfit Kappa Cartón Colombia.